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  1. SEVEN STEPS FLY CASTING METHOD

    Seven Steps Fly Casting Method

    A guide to learning fly casting

    by Dave Leonhard

     

    Seven Steps To Learning Fly Casting

    1. Setup. Proper grip and stance.
    2. Pickup and delivery. (Stop and wait. Stop and wait, and deliver.)
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  2. TYING THE HENDRICKSON BIOT-BODY DUN

    This week's fly is the 5th in the 2022 fly tying class series. The Hendrickson Biot-Body Dun is a great first of the season patterns.

    CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO TYING THE HENDRICKSON BIOT-BODY DUN

    Hendrickson hatches occur in water that has lots of gravel and faster moving water. The emergence occurs late mornings to early afternoons when water temps reach 53 degrees. Vulerable crippled insects are prime for fish to take and they look for them. This pattern rides low in the water floats well and is perfect for the emergence all late April and early May. For more infomation, check out "The Gentleman's Hatch" on https://streamsideorvis.com/blog/post/the-gentlemans-hatch-hendricksons

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  3. TYING THE OL' GUY CADDIS

     CLICK HERE TO WATCH HOW TO TIE THE OL' GUY CADDIS

    We first discovered this pattern in the late 1970's in Grayling. The pattern is a very low riding one and is very sparsely tied. The one we are tying in black with the green egg sac is deadly when fished during black caddis egg laying in the late afternoon to early evening on either the AuSable or Upper Manistee rivers in May. When fishing the Hendrickson spinner falls, be sure to have this pattern in your box when feeders won't take your
    Hendrickson spinner pattern. They are probably on the egg-laying caddis. This one will work. In a tan or olive body color (both in #12 and #14), this can be one of the best mid-afternoon prospecting patterns in June and July.

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  4. TYING THE HATCH MASTER

    CLICK HERE TO WATCH TYING THE HATCH MASTER

    This week's fly for the 2022 fly tying class is the Hatch Master. Harry Darbee and his wife Elsie were pioneers in the art of tying fine, sparsely-tied dry flies in the traditional Catskill style in the 1930’s. Harry Darbee invented the Hatch Master using mallard flank and breast feathers to create the illusion of a large heavy bodied mayfly without the actual bulk that was difficult to float. This is a highly creative design t

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  5. TYING THE NEARNUFF CRAYFISH

    CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO WATCH THE YOUTUBE VIDEO TYING WHITLOCK'S NEARNUFF CRAYFISH.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbPqcC_XrMo

    The NearNuff Crawfish pattern was invented by Dave Whitlock to fish for trout on the White River in Arkansas. Dave Whitlock, who lives on the Red River near the White River, designed the pattern to represent the bottom dwelling crayfish that live on the bottom of the White and are a favorite food for large brown trout. It has become on of our best patterns for fooling large smallmouth and carp on the Lake Michigan flats in early June. 

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  6. TYING THE EP BAITFISH

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  7. TYING PAT'S RUBBER-LEGGED STONEFLY

    CLICK THE LINK TO VIEW THE FIRST FLY OF THE 2022 FLY TYING CLASS, PAT'S RUBBER-LEGGED STONEFLY.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JH3Ok--7Z8

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  8. 5 Most Common Casting Errors


    Dave Leonhard casting

    Watch Orvis' Pete Kutzer demonstrate 5 common casting errors that you can try to avoid. https://howtoflyfish.orvis.com/video-lessons/fly-casting/406-correcting_common_casting_mistakes

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  9. GEARING UP FOR THE HEX HATCH

    Gearing Up For The Hex Hatch

    by Dave Leonhard

    The big bugs are nearly here. Sulfurs (both of the tiny pale yellow mayflies ephemerella invarias #16 and ephemerella dorotheas #18), yellow stoneflies #12-14, brown drakes #10, isonychia bicolor #10, and of course, the hexagenia limbata (hex #4-6). It doesn’t matter that you know the Latin names of the insects that will be hatching over the next several weeks, but it will certainly matter that you match the size, shape, and color of them with your flies to fool the feeding fish. Size does matter.

     
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  10. The Silent Hatch

    This article appeared for the first time in Spring of 2003 as an article I wrote for Michigan Trout’s Shooting Lines. I suggested we reprint it in an effort to avoid a “silent hatch” this year on our favorite streams.

    The Silent Hatch

    By Dave Leonhard

    Many years ago, I wrote a fictitious article about two fly anglers fishing on a Michigan river during the brown drake hatch just as the hex were starting in late June.

    The story revolves around two anglers who set out for a weekend of fishing. The two fellas had set up camp at a nearby State campground one Friday night in mid-June and hurried off to the river to find clouds of brown drakes over the water. Filled with excitement they found fish feeding all over the river. With nearly a dozen large trout feeding in front of them they each caught and kept two browns over 16 inches which they

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